Talks

March 5, 2018
12:15 pm
CK Choi, Room 120

Breaking with Europe’s Past: Memory, Reconciliation, and Ontological (In)security

Bahar Rumelili, Associate Profesor and Jean Monnet Chair, Department of International Relations, Koc University

The European Union is widely credited for consolidating a democratic ‘security community’ in Europe, and bringing about a definitive break with war-torn and authoritarian/totalitarian pasts in many European countries. Drawing on recent discussions in ontological security studies, this article points out that these radical breaks may have come at the expense of ontological insecurity at the societal and individual levels in Europe. While conventional teleological narratives often treat reconciliation and breaking with the past as automatic by-products of European integration, ontological security theory calls for greater attention to the societal tensions and anxieties triggered by these transformations and how they are being managed –more or less successfully- through reconciliation dynamics and memory politics in different societal settings. The article draws comparative theoretical and empirical insights from case-specific literatures on reconciliation and memory politics in Europe to develop an ontological security perspective on European integration.  

 


October 24, 2017
3.30pm
C.K. Choi, Room 351

Spain and Catalonia: The October 1 Referendum and Beyond

Francisco Colom
Spanish National Research Council in Madrid

 


September 25, 2017
12.15pm,
C.K. Choi, Room 120

The 2017 German Federal Election: A Panel Discussion

With panelists:

  • Professor Antje Ellermann, Director of the Institute for European Studies and Associate Professor of Political Science at UBC
  • Professor Kurt Hübner, Jean Monnet Chair for European Integration and Global Political Economy at UBC
  • Professor Richard Johnston, Canada Research Chair in Public Opinion, Elections, and Representation at UBC
  • Professor Steven Weldon, Director of the Centre for Public Opinion and Political Representation and Associate Professor of Political Science at Simon Fraser University

Chaired by Professor Rima Wilkes, Professor of Sociology at UBC